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How Do We Learn from Our Mistakes?

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What we may have learned from this year, is that even with the best of intentions, things do not always go the way we wish they might. Regardless, we pick ourselves up, continue moving forward with the information at hand and try to do our best. As such, if you find that you made a mistake, either in the workplace, college or your personal life, you must pick yourself up, move forward and continue doing your best. But how do we do this? How do we learn from our mistakes in order to move forward to continue doing our best, despite setbacks and challenges?

If you find that you have made a mistake, remain calm and remember that there is some positive in the situation. You read that correctly. After the mistake has been made and rectified, identify what went right and incorporate those small victories into your next project. The only way to reduce the number of mistakes we make is to use each as a learning opportunity. If you have made similar mistakes in the past, in addition to identifying what went right, identify the root causes of these mistakes. Are you seeing a pattern?

There may be times when you have made a mistake but are unclear how or why it occurred. You may have planned well, read all the instructions and took your time but mistakes were still made. The best way to understand the situation is to listen to feedback. Do not think of criticism in a negative manner or as proof of any shortcomings. If you are being offered feedback, you have the opportunity to listen to other perspectives, learn and improve.

The key is to remember that failure is part of the process, but you will learn, advance and be more ready for what lies ahead. This year has taught us that people are resilient, strong and unstoppable. And though we may face new challenges, tough situations and unforeseen hurdles, we will come out the other end even stronger, tougher and more ready than ever to take on what every life may throw our way.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist

Student NEWS

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Ethics Matters

October 2020

Lipscomb University is starting off the holiday season by spreading joy! Members encouraged students to stop by their craft table and decorate cards and notes of encouragement. The chapter collected more than 100 cards that will be distributed to seniors at a local nursing home.

Oklahoma State University StudentCPT teamed up with Beta Alpha Psi and ACE to host Strategies for Success. Students had the chance to network with OSU alumni, practice navigating ethical dilemmas and received career advice.

University of Colorado, Colorado Springs welcomed three new officers to serve next semester. Congratulations and thank you for your leadership!

CPT Hosts Second Lead with Integrity Series of 2020

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Ethics Matters

October 2020

Over the summer, the highly anticipated StudentCPT Leadership Conference was canceled due to COVID-19 concerns. The NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) swiftly adjusted to the changing environment and put together the Lead with Integrity (LWI) series, a virtual leadership conference for college students.

After receiving great feedback, the team decided to host another series during the fall semester. Over the course of three days, more than 200 students tuned in! Linda Galindo, CEO of Galindo Consulting, focused her presentation on leading with authenticity and accountability, and CPT President, Alfonzo Alexander, shared his leadership tips for success. The week ended with Brian Griffith, CEO and Founder of G360, discussing the importance of giving and receiving honest feedback. He then gave students free access to the G360 assessment tool.

Thank you to the speakers who made the fall series possible! The CPT will continue to host the Lead with Integrity virtual leadership series in the spring and fall semesters as another way to connect with students near and far.

LEAD WITH INTEGRITY:Serving With Optimism in 2021

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Ethics Matters

October 2020

As we conclude this year, I am reflecting on this unusual “experience” we call 2020, and I am optimistically visualizing 2021. Yesterday, a friend told me a story of a woman sharing her goals for 2020. Unfortunately, the woman was not able to reach any of them because of the impact of the global pandemic. Amazingly, this woman was able to make light of it and be optimistic about next year. It was refreshing to hear the story because I am choosing the same approach for the remainder of 2020 and all of 2021.

I encourage you to join me and this unknown woman as we look to live and lead with confidence and in expectation. I plan to focus on a few growth areas to help me achieve my goals for 2021. These items are not my goals, but they are critical to me achieving them. Here is my list: 1) Grow my relationships with key people in my life, 2) Model the behavior I desire from others, 3) Celebrate the success of others around me, 4) Acknowledge when things are done right (ethically), and 5) Inspire others.

As you can see, in 2021, my path to attaining my goals is through serving others. I firmly believe helping the people I am tasked with leading to achieve success will help me accomplish my goals. I also believe that as I encourage others to win, wisdom for my journey will come my way. This concept of paying it forward has led to success for me and many other leaders. In 2021, I will make it a priority to serve others before self. I look forward to seeing others grow and to seeing how it impacts me, too. Earlier, I encouraged you to join me in this journey. Now, I challenge you to come with me and enter 2021 with confidence and a willingness to serve others. It is a great opportunity we have as leaders.

Happy Holidays. Thank you for your continued support. Lead with Integrity!

Why the CPT Needs Your Support

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Ethics Matters

October 2020

To say this year has been “unique,” would be an understatement, and the adjustments we had to make due to the pandemic impacted most everyone. However, what hasn’t changed, is the role the NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) plays in impacting the lives of college students to shape ethical leaders for the future.

Each year, the CPT reaches thousands of college students through programming, like the Lead with Integrity Series, the Ethics in Action Video Competition, the Student Leadership Conference, leadership activities through 49 StudentCPT chapters across the United States, Virgin Islands and Guam, and trainings and speaking engagements with colleges and universities. This exposure to ethical leadership for thousands of students only happens thanks to people like you. Your generous support and donations make a difference, and the CPT truly appreciates your support.

As 2020 comes to an end, please consider the CPT for your year end contributions. You can donate by visiting the website at thecpt.org/donations/ or through the CPT’s Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K at thecpt.org/run-for-whats-right/. You can even donate while making purchases on Amazon by shopping on smile.amazon.com. Checks can also be mailed to:

Center for the Public Trust
P.O. Box 306262
Nashville, TN 37230-6272

Again, thank you for your support of the CPT and ethical leadership development!

Good News:It is Important to Give Back

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Ethics Matters

October 2020

Despite the curves that 2020 has thrown, organizations continue to give back to communities around the country. Large and small, companies across several industries understand that when we give back to our communities and those in need, we allow everyone the opportunity to thrive.

TOMS donates a pair of shoes for every pair that is sold, UncommonGoods continues their Better to Give program, which donates one dollar to a participating partner of your choice with every purchase, Warby Parker initiated a Buy a Pair, Give a Pair program, The Honest Company spreads holiday cheer with toy donations and raising money for a children’s hospital, and the list goes on. Now, it is your opportunity to give back.

The NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) relies on donors to continue its programs throughout the year to advance ethical leadership among students and professionals. By developing, encouraging, acknowledging and promoting ethical leaders, the CPT is helping current and future business leaders regain the public’s trust and make sound ethical decisions.
This holiday season, please consider giving back by donating to the CPT.

Visit https://thecpt.org/donations/ to give back today. Thank you!

Join the Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K Today!

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Ethics Matters

October 2020

Are you ready to Run for What’s Right? You still have time to show your support and join the NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) for this year’s Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K. What is a virtual 5K? All you have to do is walk or run 3.1 miles by December 31, 2020. Even if you’re not a runner or walker, you can log the equivalent of 3.1 miles by doing any of the following activities:

• Golfing (without a cart) for 90 minutes
• One hour of gardening or yardwork
• A leisurely hike for 40 minutes
• A 35-minute bike ride
• Exercising on the elliptical for 30 minutes

*Runners and challengers will receive a medal and t-shirt for participating

Join the Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K and help the CPT cross the finish line by reaching the fundraising goal set for 2020.

Visit thecpt.org/run-for-whats-right for more information, to register, and to donate.
You can also contact the CPT at info@thecpt.org.

How to Answer the Age-Old Question: Tell Me About Yourself

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No matter how many interviews you sit for, or for whom you are interviewing, you will inevitably be asked the same introductory question: tell me about yourself. You may have an elevator speech already prepared. Perhaps you include certain facts about your educational background, personal life and interests. But are you sure you are answering correctly or rather in a way that will help you secure the position at stake?

When encountered with this question, consider your past as well as your present. It is important to touch upon both to showcase your skills over an extended period. Before the interview, be sure to carefully read the job description. Once you have a handle on the requirements, think about skills you acquired in your past roles and identify recent stories that demonstrate them.  Additionally, highlight how your current role has prepared you for the new position. For example, discuss the responsibilities that you currently manage as well as the daily tasks and skillsets that will help you transition into the new role.

According to Robert Half, when putting together your self-summary, or elevator pitch, you must prepare a short script that highlights your relevant abilities, strengths and areas of expertise. Once you’ve listed these, be sure to clearly state the reason you decided to apply for the job. During this step, be sure to stay focused on career-related motivations, which include more responsibilities or the desire to gain experience in new areas. Finally, explain to your interviewer what it is about this role that excites and interests you. To do so, be sure to do your homework prior to the interview. Research the company to find out more about their mission, values and goals.

Lastly, give specifics. When asked the question, consider at least three past experiences that you believe are relevant to the new position. These examples should be quantifiable in terms of time, money or people. Next, highlight your strengths in a similar manner, such as past experiences, skills and helpful traits you possess. The more specifics you can give, rather than general statements, the better. Remember, you want to be memorable in the best way.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist

Essential Traits of a Sustainable Leader

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You may have been hearing a lot about sustainable leadership, but might not be familiar with the term. Sustainability leadership is a process of influence that delivers direction, alignment and commitment, and aims to address social, environmental and economic issues to create a better world. Of course, this year has introduced several new challenges, including environmental, social and economic issues. Therefore, companies are interested in leaders that understand how to resolve such issues in a sustainable way.

If you are looking to create a sustainable culture in the workplace, you must focus on transparency and honesty. Be honest with yourself when determining the shortcomings of your leadership in terms of behaviors that can sabotage development and performance. With hard work, you can create an honest and transparent work environment for your team. This is crucial when dealing with sustainability risks in every corner of the business — from the supply chain to negative branding.

Another way to become a sustainable leader is to keep environmental concerns front-of-mind. Identify the major environmental risks, such as climate change, water usage, employee transportation, emissions output, telecommuting and distribution chain policies to name a few. Analyze how these issues affect the long-term sustainability of your organization and their social impact to determine what can be done to curb future harm.

Lastly, talk to your team! Employees often have ideas about ways to improve sustainability within the company. According to a 2019 HP Workforce Sustainability Survey, 96 percent of respondents indicated they would be willing to recommend their workplace if they felt their employer’s sustainability practices were ahead of the industry. It may be beneficial to team up with your HR department and find ways to  gather feedback from your employees on these issues, allowing them the opportunity to feel heard. Great ideas come from across all levels within an organization, so let’s work together to become more sustainable.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist

Ways to Make Minority Students Feel Heard

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Whether students are taking classes online or in-person, as a teacher, mentor or tutor, you strive to inspire, teach and excite them on their journey. Although you may be using new techniques, formats and measures these days to reach your learners, your students deserve to feel heard, safe and empowered. As you think about ways to uphold a welcoming learning environment, be sure to focus on the needs of your minority students. According to a 2020 article in Teacher Week, African American students are not only statistically more likely to know someone who has died or been hospitalized with COVID-19-related illness, but given the social and economic realities, they are also more likely to have firsthand experience through their family life with housing and employment hardships in this pandemic. Therefore, if schools can serve the students most vulnerable to underperformance in this school closure crisis, they are more likely able to better develop the policies and practices to support the engagement and learning outcomes for everyone.

As with any successful relationship, communication is key. When serving minority students, you may want to carve out some time to speak to them about their experiences and the support they may want or need. Armed with this knowledge, you can incorporate their feedback into your lesson plans.

Additionally, try to include culturally responsive teaching into your curriculum. Culturally responsive teaching strives to include literature from other cultures, parts of the world, and by diverse authors. This way of teaching offers students a chance to see themselves and their experiences in the materials that they are covering.

It is important to keep in mind; however you decide to continue your lessons, the various backgrounds, communities and identities of those in your actual and virtual classrooms. Connection with your students will help to enhance the learning environment for everyone.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist