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Tips to Empower and Help Women to Delegate in the Workplace

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During Women’s History Month this year, we look at how women in the workplace can better delegate responsibilities and duties. Delegating in the office can be a delicate balance of being assertive and direct but also gracious and understanding of other’s needs. It is important to remember that delegating is not a sign of weakness, but rather an opportunity to empower your colleagues.

When delegating, be sure to include clear instructions on how the project should be carried out. Assume the person does not know anything about the task at hand and provide them with the tools necessary to complete the task at-hand. It may also be wise to provide step-by-step instructions as well. If you already have these instructions in place, you will be able to have them ready should another such task be required of the same person or someone else.

According to an article in Diversity Woman Media, to help overcome cultural barriers to effective delegation, Kim-Yen Huynh, Senior Vice President of Marketing at First Vietnamese American Bank in Westminster, California, and founder and president of the Asian American Women Business Association, advises women to believe in their own abilities as well as their capacity to be successful. “It doesn’t matter if you are black or yellow, if you do things right and demonstrate self-confidence, you will be looked at as a leader.”

If you are new to delegating tasks, for several reasons, do not be concerned. There are several ways to ease into the habit of delegating. For example, take a small step in this direction by assigning a small task that is not time sensitive. This will be a great way to introduce you to the process and allow you to practice asking for help.

When starting out, you will also want to begin with the employees that you trust the most. When considering who to ask, consider who has the skills or experience, who needs the developmental experience, who has the time now, or could make the time by delegating something currently on their plate? Who would like to have this opportunity? Once you have this person in place, practice delegating and before long you will be able to tackle your to-do lists in a more efficient way.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist

We want to hear from you!

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

The NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) invites you to participate in a 15-minute survey to provide valuable feedback on the CPT’s brand strategy. The results of this project will shape future strategies for marketing and communication for the CPT, so your responses are very important.

Thank you in advance for taking the time to complete this survey!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8L5B6VP

STUDENT NEWS

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

The Lead with Integrity (LWI) Speaker Series is back! Over the course of three days, for one hour each day, national speakers will present on topics such as ethical leadership, equity, integrity, academic honesty, and more. StudentCPT and non StudentCPT leaders alike are invited to join the virtual leadership conference. Learn more at studentcpt.org.

Tuesday, March 2, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Central)
Mariah Yates, PhD, Assistant Professor – Management at Western Kentucky University’s Gordon Ford College of Business

Wednesday, March 3, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Central)
Alfonzo Alexander, Chief Ethics and Diversity Officer of the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) and President of NASBA’s Center for the Public Trust (CPT)

Thursday, March 4, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Central)
Traci Otey Blunt, SVP Corporate Communications, National Football League (NFL)

LEAD WITH INTEGRITY Going WIDE in 2021

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

We are excited about this year and what we will accomplish in 2021. The NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) will go WIDE in 2021. Allow me to explain.

Wisdom…At the CPT, we often speak of the value of a mentor. Regardless of age or experience level, we all need mentors. Mentors bring us wisdom. Wisdom can come from many sources; prayer, advice, reading, listening to elders, experiencing new things, etc. In 2021, one of the ways the CPT will go WIDE is through the pursuit and growth
of wisdom.

Innovation…In 2020, we learned we must create new ways to accomplish our goals. We all saw organizations and individuals use innovation on new levels. In 2021, I believe the distinguishing element for many will be innovation. Even when the pandemic ends, things will be different. In 2021, you will see the CPT’s innovation. We will introduce improvements and technological upgrades, new programs and exciting events.

Discipline…To balance innovation, one needs discipline in order to remain focused on the important. Using the CPT’s mission and strategic plan as our guide, we will have a disciplined approach in 2021. We recognize the value and impact we can make at the CPT. However, we also know our discipline and consistency will drive our overall effectiveness. We are committed to our mission, strategy and disciplined execution.

Execution…All the great plans in the world mean nothing without execution. At the end of 2021, we expect to look back at how we went WIDE and executed at an extremely high level. I learned from my athletic background that execution can defeat talent and can overcome a lack of resources. We plan to passionately pursue execution each time we have an opportunity to develop, empower and promote ethical leaders in 2021.

We invite you to join our journey as we go WIDE. As always, lead with integrity.

The CPT Cohosts 15th Annual Audit Conference

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

More than 150 business leaders, public accountants, educators, and policy setters convened for Ensuring Integrity: The 15th Annual Audit Conference, on December 1 – 2, 2020. Hosted by the Robert Zicklin Center for Corporate Integrity at Baruch College and the NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT), the annual conference provided a forum for interaction and discussion between representatives from the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB).

CPT President Alfonzo Alexander opened the conference by welcoming guests and giving opening remarks. The program was headlined by Diana Stoltzfus, Deputy Chief Accountant, Office of the Chief Accountant at the SEC, and Barbara Vanich, Deputy Chief Auditor, Office of the Chief Auditor, PCAOB.

Other conference speakers and panelists included: George Botic (PCAOB), Jim Burton (Grant Thornton), Ben Campbell (Deloitte), Douglas Carmichael (Baruch College), Harry Cohen (KPMG LLP), Bob Dohrer (RSM), Audrey Gramling (Oklahoma State), Tracy Harding (ASB), Chair, Susan Jones (KPMG International), Kathleen Karatas (Bee, Bergvall & Co.), Diane Larsen (EY), Jeff Mahoney (Council of Institutional Investors), Mike Maloney (Credibility International), Dennis McGowan (Center for Audit Quality), Claudius Modesti, (Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP), and Alan Skinner (Carr Riggs & Ingram).

For the first time in its 15-year history, the conference was held virtually, via Zoom, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The duration of the conference was shortened, and the program was divided over two days for all attendees to retain the maximum amount of information. The conference will be featured in an upcoming issue of The CPA Journal. Are you interested in attending the 2021 conference? Email info@thecpt.org for more information.

GOOD NEWS: Amazon Updates the Public on How it is Helping Protect Employees and Communities During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

For nearly a year since this pandemic began, essential workers have been just that – essential. They have helped purchase groceries for families, taught children in virtual classrooms, and delivered packages and mail. As we continue to quarantine in
our homes, delivery drivers and fulfillment center workers continue to help us get through each day by supplying us with our varying needs in a safe and socially distant way.

Recently, Amazon described on its website what it is doing to keep its employees and their communities safe during this very busy time for the company. The company’s blog stated that it is lending support to President Joe Biden’s administration in its effort to vaccinate 100 million people in the first 100 days of his presidency, advocating for COVID-19 vaccinations for its front-line employees, including team members working in fulfillment and data centers, and at Whole Foods Market stores. The company has also ramped-up onsite COVID-19 testing for employees (thanks to the ingenuity of its fast-moving response team), made over 150 process updates, including enhanced cleaning and social distancing measures, and implemented disinfectant spraying and temperature checks across operations worldwide. Lastly, Amazon distributed an abundant among of personal protective gear, including millions of masks for employees and much more.

The CPT loves to hear about companies that are looking out for the best interests of their employees. Especially during these trying times, it is reassuring to learn that large companies, like Amazon, place a high importance on the safety and well-being of their workforce.

2020 NASBA CPT Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K Recap

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

During the last quarter of 2020, the NASBA Center for the Public Trust’s (CPT) Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K brought together 40 participants from across the country who committed to complete a run, walk or equivalent activity of 3.1 miles. This year, the CPT was delighted to have several students from StudentCPT chapters participate in this event for community service. The CPT’s Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K launched during NASBA’s Annual Meeting on November 2 and concluded on December 31, raising $25,639. Proceeds from this event enable the CPT to take its programs to more college campuses and support the CPT’s mission to develop, empower and promote ethical leaders.

The CPT is excited about the opportunities this support will bring to help expand pro-gram offerings to students and professionals in 2021. Thanks to all who supported the CPT’s Run for What’s Right Virtual 5K!

Your continued support is critical to the CPT’s mission. If you would like to invest in ethical leadership, please visit www.thecpt.org/donations/. Checks can also be mailed to:

Center for the Public Trust
P.O. Box 306262
Nashville, TN 37230-6272

Again, thank you for your support of the CPT and ethical leadership development!

Board Member Spotlight

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Ethics Matters

February 2021

We asked these NASBA NASBA Center for the Public Trust (CPT) CPT Board members the following question:

Why do you believe the CPT is needed?

David Costello, CPA – The CPT is not a cure for illicit and unethical behavior, but it does point university students, professionals, businesses, and government to the north star of doing the right thing. Even in times of ethical crises, we still search for dreamers, those leaders who propel significant and positive change in our society. The CPT continues to be dream-fluenced and is driven to share our dream—our mission, “to develop, empower and promote ethical leaders.”

Is the CPT needed? Negative, destructive, dark forces and detestable conduct must not ever approach normality. That’s reason enough for the CPT.

Donald Burkett, CPA – The vision of the CPT is advancing ethical leadership to influence the world. In our world today, there is a staggering absence of moral and ethical behavior. I believe that ethics is the lynchpin to the successful longevity of any business or relationship. If the CPT is successful in its vision of advancing ethical leadership, our impact will evolve for generations.

Don’t Attend Another Virtual Meeting Without Doing These Things First!

Five Ways to Enhance Your Zoom Experience

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If you work from home, chances are that you have attended a Zoom meeting (or a hundred). Since early last year, those that work from home have relied on technology more than perhaps they have ever before. From a strong Wi-Fi network to conducting meetings online, our workdays revolve around/in the virtual world. With that being said, below are a few ways to make the experience the best that it can be.

1. If you are late to a meeting, do not fear. There is a way for you to enter the meeting without causing too much ruckus and disturbing your team. To enter the meeting silently, click on the Settings gear icon in the Zoom app. Next, be sure to click on the Audio tab, where you can check the box for “’Mute my microphone when joining a meeting.” Once you are in the meeting, you will be able to unmute yourself when you are ready to speak.

2. Did you forget to clean your house before jumping on a virtual call? Zoom allows you to change the background on your video. By doing so, you will be able to conceal distracting artwork on the walls or that pile of laundry you have been meaning to throw in the washer. To insert some privacy on your calls, simply click on Settings in Zoom, and go to Virtual Background. From there, Zoom will allow you to choose from a few selections. You can even upload your own image if you so desire.

3. Many people can agree that the camera can be unforgiving. Which is why it is difficult to accept the fact that you rely on it for most, if not all, of your workday interactions. So, we dress for our day, adjust the lighting, and angle the camera to show our best angle. But if you are looking for an even bigger boost to your on-camera appearance, Zoom has a feature for that. The application has a Zoom’s Touch Up My Appearance feature, which is intended to give your overall appearance a smoother look.

4. Whether or not you consider yourself tech-savvy, keyboard shortcuts are simple ways anyone can speed up commands. While we are all so busy multitasking these days, any time-saving trick is much appreciated. Below, are a few shortcuts you can try on your next call:

  • Mute or unmute audio: Alt + A (Command + Shift + A)
  • Mute the entire group at once: Alt + M (Command + Control + M)
  • Start or stop video: Alt + V (Command + Shift + V)
  • Pause or resume screen sharing: Alt + T (Command + Shift + T)
  • Start recording a meeting: Alt + R (Command + Shift + R)
  • Pause or resume screen recording: Alt + P (Command + Shift + P)
  • Switch camera: Alt + N (Command + Shift + N)
  • Raise or lower hand: Alt + Y (Option + Y)
  • Open the invite window: Alt + I (Command + I)

5. Are you having issues hearing participants on calls? It could be your microphone. If you are using a desktop, Zoom allows you to calibrate your microphone. To do so, simply click the Settings icon, choose the “Audio” option and then make sure your preferred volume setting is selected. You may adjust your volume if necessary.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist

How Do We Learn from Our Mistakes?

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What we may have learned from this year, is that even with the best of intentions, things do not always go the way we wish they might. Regardless, we pick ourselves up, continue moving forward with the information at hand and try to do our best. As such, if you find that you made a mistake, either in the workplace, college or your personal life, you must pick yourself up, move forward and continue doing your best. But how do we do this? How do we learn from our mistakes in order to move forward to continue doing our best, despite setbacks and challenges?

If you find that you have made a mistake, remain calm and remember that there is some positive in the situation. You read that correctly. After the mistake has been made and rectified, identify what went right and incorporate those small victories into your next project. The only way to reduce the number of mistakes we make is to use each as a learning opportunity. If you have made similar mistakes in the past, in addition to identifying what went right, identify the root causes of these mistakes. Are you seeing a pattern?

There may be times when you have made a mistake but are unclear how or why it occurred. You may have planned well, read all the instructions and took your time but mistakes were still made. The best way to understand the situation is to listen to feedback. Do not think of criticism in a negative manner or as proof of any shortcomings. If you are being offered feedback, you have the opportunity to listen to other perspectives, learn and improve.

The key is to remember that failure is part of the process, but you will learn, advance and be more ready for what lies ahead. This year has taught us that people are resilient, strong and unstoppable. And though we may face new challenges, tough situations and unforeseen hurdles, we will come out the other end even stronger, tougher and more ready than ever to take on what every life may throw our way.

-Dina Barabash, NASBA Content Development & Web Specialist